Post Doctoral Trainees and Senior Research Staff

Postdoctoral Trainees


Research Interests:

The possibility to generate tissues and organs in vitro from embryonic stem cells is important because of its potential uses in cell therapy and application for regenerative medicine. Most of the studies using embryoid bodies (EBs) apply signaling molecules in the medium, therefore EBs are instructed homogeneous in all directions. This approach leads to a spherically symmetrical external to internal gradient of stimulation. The main goal of my project is to take control of the instruction and organization of zebrafish and mouse EBs, imposing them asymmetric information that should direct patterning of 3D structures, defining clear symmetry axes along which embryo and/or organ morphogenesis will occur in vitro.

Research Interests:

TBA

Research Interests:

My research are focused on the late events of Ebola virus entry into host cells and more specifically on the understanding of the very last event that triggers fusion between Ebola enveloppe glycoprotein and the membrane of late endosomes/lysosomes. The goal of my research is to find glycoprotein determinants and host factors involved in this fusion triggering step.

Research Interests:

TBA

Research Interests:

I’m interested in the genetic control of sensory hair cell and the organ of corti development. One primary focus is to understand the mechanisms underlying planar polarization of sensory hair cells and morphogenesis of the hair bundle.

Research Interests:

TBA


Senior Research Staff


Research Interests:

My work is focused on small GTPases of the Arf and Rab families, and their roles in membrane trafficking and cell motility. My expertise is in imaging and quantitative image analysis.

Research Interests:

I am interested in how cells both create and respond to their extracellular environment in order to generate form.

Research Interests:
I’m interested in the biomechanical basis of morphogenic movements and in particular, how cells generate force and how those forces are integrated across tissues to drive those movements.  I currently study how Plakoglobin and Keratin help facilitate adhesion and transduce force from cell to cell, as well as the mechanistic cellular basis for a recently characterized morphogenic movement, Convergent Thickening (CT), both in the frog Xenopus laevis.  I’m also interested in how morphogenic mechanisms vary across species and in understanding how and why these variations evolved.  For example, other frogs use CT differently than Xenopus, while salamanders appear to have a very different cellular basis for CT and also use a bilateral primitive streak ingression mechanism, largely absent in frogs, to internalize their mesoderm.