Volume 2 Issue 1

Table of Contents

Welcome To GBS ………………………………… Page 2

New Student Census …………………….………. Page 3

Fall Events and Summer Snapshots…………….. Page 4

Science Hot Topics………………………..……….. Page 5

Habits of Highly Effective Grad Student…….….. Page 6

Science Policy and You……………………..……. Page 7

Interview with Hillary St. John……………..…….. Page 8

Acknowledgements and GBS Contact Info…….. Page 9

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To hear the full story, feel free to listen to the podcast or read the transcript and notes here!

References

  1. http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v542/n7639/full/nature21056.html
  2. https://quickdraw.withgoogle.com/
  3. https://www-03.ibm.com/press/us/en/pressrelease/51643.wss

 

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It is understandable that many students focus on developing their technical skills and knowledge while in graduate school. However, it can be good to consider the broader context of your science in society. The March for Science and debates over the budgets of agencies like NIH and DOE, show the important relationship between science, politics, and government. More importantly, science policy directly affects us as students. Cuts in agency budgets reduce the number of grants given out and can limit the number of students that programs can support. Changes in programs like the BRAIN initiative affect what research is funded, while changes in programs like the NSF Innovation Corps program can even change education. These developments are guided by people working on “policy for science” and are meant to improve the research and technology capabilities of the US. On the other hand is “science for policy”, where knowledge from research is used to guide policy decisions. This can range from setting regulations on pollutants to approving medical devices and pharmaceuticals to developing responses to disease outbreaks.

People with research backgrounds are essential to both sides of science policy whether that’s helping to translate scientific results to policymakers or using their own understanding of scientific institutions to improve them for the next generation. You can get involved in science policy through many different fellowships meant for young PhDs like the American Association for the Advancement of Science’s Science and Technology Policy Fellowships or the Presidential Management Fellows program. As a student or recent graduate, you could work in the National Academies’ Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Graduate Fellowship Program. At UVA, we are lucky to have many alumni of these programs as professors and researchers who can help you navigate these pathways to work in science policy. The new Science Policy Initiative at UVA is a graduate student organization aimed at increasing awareness of career pathways in science policy, providing resources and professional development to STEM graduate students interested in policy, and acting as advocates for science. If you would like to learn more, we will be hosting a lunch seminar series during the fall as well as an all-day symposium on November 6. Check out our website for more information (SPIatUVA.org).

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Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Website

More info about their Mission

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Any questions, concerns or opinions? Feel free to fill out our survey,
email Tori Osinski at vo3sc@virginia.edu,
or leave a comment below!

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Podcast – GBS Newsletter Volume 2 Issue 1

Why/How We Get Cancer Podcast by Jeremy Shaw

Do you want to understand why cancer happens, but don’t want to be bogged down by a bunch of big science words? This podcast explains cancer biology in simple terms so that anyone can understand and be informed. Enjoy!

 

 

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Download the Transcript:

 

 

 

Download the Podcast Notes/Links:

 

 

 

 

Volume 1 Issue 3

Table of Contents

Congrats to the Graduates! ………………………………… Page 2

GBS Symposium Award Winners …………………………. Page 3

Promoting Compassion …………………………………….. Page 6

America First: A Budget Blueprint ………………………….. Page 7

GBS Career Panel Recap ………………………………….. Page 8

Interviews with Alumni ………………………………………. Page 9

Science Hot Topics ………………………………………….. Page 11

Stories You May Have Missed ……………………………… Page 13

Acknowledgements and Survey Link …………..………….. Page 14

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If you would like to learn more about C.A.L.M. and sign up for their weekly newsletter, please visit http://www.amedicinalmind.com/our-newsletter-a-week-of-compassion.html. And for more information on the School of Nursing Compassionate Care initiative, visit https://cci.nursing.virginia.edu/.

 

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We have compiled a brief collection of stories from the past month that you may have missed. Ranging from year-in-review to headlines to food-for-thought, we hope you find something interesting.

Cell Press launches “Sneak Peek” feature to explore papers under review

Pubmed doesn’t have enough literature to keep you busy? Then, check out “Sneak Peek” from Cell Press and Mendeley, which makes complete manuscripts available from papers under review with Cell Press. The goal is to reduce the time readers need to wait from submission to publication. Authors can opt-in to share their manuscripts through this service. To use this, you can join the public Mendeley user group. Mendeley is a free citation manager software. Cell Press publishes journals such as Cell, Immunity, Neuron, and Trends.

Source:
http://www.cell.com/sneakpeek

Vaccine Myths – share with friends and family!

Recent headlines, such as a mumps outbreak in Minnesota, demonstrate the effect of efforts to question the “safety” of vaccines. Science recently compiled common myths and facts about vaccines. While staying up to date on popular misconceptions can be difficult, scientific awareness and education is a vital part of our mission as professional scientists.

Source:
http://science.sciencemag.org/content/356/6336/368

FDA Approves 23andMe to sell genetic test for some disorders

At the start of April, the FDA approved 23andMe to sell their genetic testing kits to be used for select medical conditions. This is the first approval of a test to be permitted for sale directly to consumers that provides genetic information. Using a small saliva sample, 23andMe tests 500,000 genetic variants and can be used to measure risk for conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s, Celiac and more. The FDA noted that the approval was also due the strong association of these diseases with genetic mutations supported by scientific literature, but cautioned against using the kit results to inform treatment decisions.

Announcement:
https://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm551185.htm

Source:
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/06/health/fda-genetic-tests-23andme.html?_r=0

 

Recent analysis shows impact of NIH funding on economy

30.8% of NIH grants between 1980 and 2007 supported an article cited by a commercial patent, according to an analysis published in Science. Patents can serve as a measure for economic growth. The analysis showed a surprising, “indirect” impact of government funded research, rather than looking at solely at patents or companies directly established by academic researchers. By this analysis, every $100 million of NIH spending yields approximately 23 patents. Likewise, every $1 the NIH spends yields $1.40 in drug sales, which does not include benefits derived from devices, techniques, or public health improvements.

Source:
http://www.nature.com/news/nih-research-grants-yield-economic-windfall-1.21752#/b1

CRISPR research complicates older genetic studies

As researchers turn to CRISPR for their research, new studies report discrepancies between large screens using RNAi or morpholinos and genetic mutants. The accessibility of CRISPR-based gene targeting permits researchers to validate previous studies, but this has led to concerns about reports invalidating entire bodies of literature. While targeted genetic approaches may shake-up scientific foundations, new studies do not “mean one approach was right and the other wrong.”

Source:
http://www.nature.com/news/crispr-studies-muddy-results-of-older-gene-research-1.21763

Google and Bioscience Research: “B is for Biotech”

Alphabet (i.e. Google) is rapidly expanding into the biotech sector, investing increasingly larger funds into life science ventures. GV (formerly, Google Ventures) has $2.4 billion dollars under management has recently invested in biotechnologies, therapeutics, and medical devices. Part of Alphabet’s package include their own biotech companies Verily and Calico. While some are critical of Google’s ability to “disrupt” medicine and disease, successes achieved in biology provide an attractive frontier for future investments and potential returns.

Source:
http://www.fiercebiotech.com/biotech/b-for-biotech-alphabet-and-its-search-for-life-science-glory

 

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Any questions, concerns or opinions? Feel free to fill out our survey
or email Tori Osinski at vo3sc@virginia.edu

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Volume 1 Issue 2

GBS Newsletter logo

Table of Contents

A Few Final Words from the Graduates………………………………………………………..Page 2

Faculty Chats: Identifying a Compelling Scientific Question…………………………………Page 3

Build Your Brand: Highlights from Beer and Branding………………………………………..Page 4

Interview with an Expert: Epidemiologist……………………………………………………….Page 5

Team Effort: Dual Job Searches…………………………………………………………………Page 6

Internship: Licensing & Ventures Group………………………………………………………..Page 8

Science Hot Topics: Zika…………………………………………………………………………Page 9

Science In Review………………………………………………………………………………..Page 10

GBS 2016 in Review……………………………………………………………………………..Page 11

Acknowledgements……………………………………………………………………………….Page 12

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Fall 2016 Gradutes

Final Words from Grads

Jeffrey Teoh 1

Jeff Teoh 2

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Ewald 1

Ewald 2

Ewald 3

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Build your brand

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Professional Column - Interviews with expert

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Team effort 1

Team Effort 2

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Internship LVG

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Zika article

Zika 1

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Science In Review 1

Science In Review - Ebola

Theranos lays off 150+ employees

The beleaguered blood-testing company Theranos Inc. recently made additional layoffs in efforts to “re-engineer” the company, cutting 41% of their staff. Once valued at $9 billion, the company originally promised comprehensive blood test analysis from only microliters of blood sample. However, after difficulties with their technology and fabricated test results, CEO Elizabeth Holmes (who founded the company at age 19) is facing multiple lawsuits and a two year ban from owning or operating a laboratory. Theranos is committed to developing its new “miniLab” testing technology. The company currently has one-quarter the employees as it did in August 2016.

Source: https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-01-06/theranos-to-fire-41-of-workforce-in-second-round-of-cuts

Science In Review - Elsevier

German Researchers lose access

to Elsevier journals

Beginning on January 1st, researchers across Germany no longer have access to Cell, The Lancet, ScienceDirect, and hundreds of journals published by Elsevier. Negotiations are ongoing between the Dutch publishing company and a German consortium of universities, libraries, and research institutes (known as “Project DEAL”). In a separate deal brokered with Elsevier, Dutch universities will pay Elsevier slightly more than the past w ith open access articles increasing to 30% by 2018. However, the German DEAL group believes this offer “doesn’t go far enough” and allows Elsevier to “double-dip” by forcing institutions to pay for access and publishing. DEAL seeks a single fee for access and publishing and that all German articles to be open access. Negotiations resume in late January.

Source: http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2016/12/thousands-german-researchers-set-lose-access-elsevier-journals

Update: http://science.sciencemag.org/content/355/6320/17

Merck’s Ebola vaccine shows 100% efficacy

Results of a recent trial, led by the World Health Organization (WHO), provide a “silver lining” to the Ebola virus disease of 2015. In a randomized trial of over 4000 contacts, a Merck-produced vaccine demonstrated 100% efficacy in those tested, including children. “The vaccine has yet to be approved by regulatory authorities, but funding from GAVI, the Vaccine Alliance has allowed Merck to produce a stash of 300,000 doses for emergency use should the virus resurface. One drawback: It was designed specifically for the strain that hit West Africa and has not been tested against other Ebola strains.”

Source: http://www.sciencemag.org/news/sifter/final-results-are-mercks-ebola-vaccine-works-really-really-well

Original Article: http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(16)32621-6/fulltext

“Science Advocacy: Get Involved”

(originally published in Nature)

Summary: With science-based challenges impacting the world more-so than ever, there is an increasing need for those who can present science in a way policy makers can understand. Nature talked to three scientists (a Dean and Cell editor, a physicist, and an ecotoxicologist) about their experience shaping scientific policy and how others can learn from their experience. These scientists briefly share their stories about how they got involved in scientific policy, specific challenges they face, and the major lessons learned. In the “Related Links,” this article also links to stories on scientific activism, “policy” as the art of science-to-government, and bringing science to political parties.

Source: http://www.nature.com/naturejobs/science/articles/10.1038/nj7634-611a
Science in Review - Slack

“How scientists use Slack”

(originally published in Nature)

Summary: Slack is one of silicon valley’s hottest companies, and one of science’s rapidly adopted communication tools. Slack is a free-mium messaging platform, designed for teams to share files, chat, and organize their work. Given that email is “generally awful,” Slack provides a robust alternative, with more than 3 million users worldwide. This article profiles how labs are using Slack to synthesize research papers, prep for conferences, monitor experiments, and integrate their labs. Check it out for your lab at slack.com.

Source: http://www.nature.com/news/how-scientists-use-slack-1.21228

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Timeline

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Acknowledgements 1

Any questions, concerns or opinions? Feel free to fill out our survey or email Tori Osinski at vo3sc@virginia.edu

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Volume 1 Issue 1

GBS Newsletter logo

 

Table of Contents

Editor’s Note…………………………………………………………………………………….Page 1

Submit Your Accomplishments………………………………………………………………..Page 1

Professional Survey……………………………………………………………………………Page 2

Informational Interviews: Biopharmaceutical Industrial Research……………………….Page 4

Informational Interviews: Clinical and Translational Research……………………………Page 5

Informational Interviews: Scientific Writing………………………………………………….Page 7

Help Expand GBS Networking………………………………………………………………..Page 9

Grant Application Tools………………………………………………………………………Page 10

Acknowledgements………………………………………………………………………….Page 11

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Message to readers

Provide feedback here.

Accomplishments

Click here to submit your accomplishments!

Profesh survery page 2_edited

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Info 1

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Info 4

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networking

 

Submit contact information here!

Grant header

Fogarty International Center
Large collections of grants searchable by career stage and funding body

 

GBS-curated list
Consolidated list of non-NIH grants for graduate students adapted from BME

 

SPIN
Huge data base of grants searchable by various criteria.  Access requires UVA IP address or Netbadge.

 

 

 

NIH Grant  application guide

Extensive suggestions for applying for grants.  While this guide primarily focuses on NIH grants, it is relevant for any application


Vanderbilt presentation

Practical guide to applying for the American heart association, NSF, UNCF Merck, US department of Veteran Affairs, and the Department of Defense.

featured grants

Paul and Daisy Soros New American Fellows

 

Supports graduate educations of New Americans (first or second generation immigrants) in their first or second year of schooling.  November deadline.  Up to two years of stipend and tuition support. 

 

The National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship Program

 

Doctoral students at the beginning of their studies are eligible to receive full tuition and required fees, and $30,500 stipend.

 

American Heart Association Fellowships

 

Fellowships available for multiple training stages and subjects covering a broad range of topics.  2017 dates and application materials have not yet been finalized.

 

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Thanks