<h2>Collective Cell Migration</h4><p>mechanical tugging forces guide individual cell behaviors that drive collective movements </p> <h2>Extracellular Matrix Assembly</h2><p>tissue tension serves as a developmental checkpoint for assembly of fibronectin fibrils at cell surfaces</p> <h2>Auditory Receptor Cells</h4><p>sensory hair cells, the receptor cells of the auditory system, detect and transduce sound-induced vibrations</p> <h2>Gastrulation in the mouse embryo  </h2><p>epibast cells undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition in the primitive streak to form the mesodermal layer </p>
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Gastrulation in the mouse embryo

epibast cells undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition in the primitive streak to form the mesodermal layer

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About Our Department

  • The primary mission of the Department of Cell Biology is the advancement of new knowledge through outstanding research, education and the training of scientific leaders of the future. We strive for tight integration between both the research enterprise and our educational and training efforts to foster an inclusive and highly interactive intellectual community built on interdisciplinary interactions and collaborations. Our goal is to use basic fundamental discovery in the fields of cell and developmental biology to drive innovation and the translation of new advances geared toward improving the human condition.

    Research in our Department builds from studies of cell function to address fascinating problems of biological complexity - how events occurring at multiple length scales (e.g., molecular, subcellular, cellular, multicellular) are integrated and combined over time to produce specialized tissues, organs and whole organisms. Explorations of this scope are essential to understanding mechanisms of embryonic development, aging, the progression of pathological states, and the repair and regeneration of damaged or diseased tissues.