Neonatology Research

Division of Neonatology Publications
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The Division of Neonatology has a long history of clinical and basic science research. UVA was a leader in clinical trials that evaluated surfactant replacement therapy and therapeutic hypothermia for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Basic science work at UVA laid the foundation for our current knowledge of the pathogenesis of spontaneous intestinal perforations. In addition, the recent finding that monitoring heart rate characteristics and variability can decrease mortality in the NICU was developed at UVA.

Clinical Research

The Clinical Trials Group within the Division of Neonatology meets on a monthly basis to discuss current and upcoming clinical research within the NICU. Some of the current clinical trials within the NICU include:

  • Ventilation prior to umbilical cord clamping
  • Lactoferrin supplementation to prevent NEC and late-onset sepsis
  • Microbiome evaluation of very-low-birthweight infants
  • Cardiorespiratory waveform analysis
  • Evaluation of early vs. late inguinal hernia repair
  • Azithromycin for the treatment of ureaplasma infections
  • Use of video technology to enhance parent/staff communication

For more detailed information regarding individual faculty member research interests and projects, please see UVa Neonatology RESEARCH PROJECTS_2017.

If you would like the UVA NICU’s participation in a clinical trial, please contact one of our Clinical Research Coordinator below.

Clinical Research/Clinical Trials Group Coordinator
Phone: 434-982-0263

Basic Science Research

Several Neonatology faculty are involved in basic science research within the Child Health Research Center. Neonatology faculty are focused on the mechanisms of neuronal injury and repair in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Additional studies are investigating the effects of early-life seizures on neuronal activation in the mouse hippocampus.  Fellows in the Division have also worked with investigators in the Divisions of Nephrology, Infectious Disease and Respiratory Medicine.

Dr. Jennifer Burnsed runs an NIH-funded lab studying neuronal activity after hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. For more information about Dr. Burnsed’s work, click here.